Upper limb / arm prosthesis 

RESTORING FUNCTION FOR PATIENTS WITH AN UPPER EXTREMITY AMPUTATION

Following an upper extremity amputation, we develop an individual prosthetic care plan to design and fit an individual effective prosthetic solution. This solution is designed around the needs of the patient, taking into account their amputation level, vocational requirements, hobbies, and desired future activities.

UPPER LIMB PROSTHETIC SOLUTIONS THROUGHOUT CHARLOTTE, ROCK HILL & LANCASTER

BELOW THE ELBOW PROSTHESIS

BODY-POWERED PROSTHESIS

EXTERNAL POWERED PROSTHESIS

ABOVE-ELBOW, SHOULDER AND BILATERAL PROSTHESIS

PROSTHETIC HANDS

PROSTHETIC WRISTS

PROSTHETIC LINERS

PROSTHETIC ARMS

SOCKET TYPES

FINGER & PARTIAL HAND

SOLUTIONS

BELOW THE ELBOW PROSTHESIS

Also known as a trans-radial amputation: describes the loss of a patient’s fingers, hand, wrist or lower arm below the elbow.

EXTERNAL POWERED PROSTHESIS

Describes using an external power source (battery) to control and power movement in a prosthesis such as a myoelectric hand or wrist.

PROSTHETIC HANDS

Prosthetic hands and terminal devices describe the components attached to the wrist of the prosthesis. They range from a simple split hook or body-powered hand to a microprocessor-controlled myoelectric hand.

PROSTHETIC WRISTS

This allows the prosthetic hand or terminal device to rotate at the wrist for optimal placement to accommodate a task. These wrists can be externally powered, body-powered, or controlled by friction.

FINGER & PARTIAL HAND

This is the most common of all levels and often most ignored. Finger prostheses can be fabricated to be either active or passive depending on the patient’s needs and what part of the finger or hand is missing.

High definition silicone fingers can be fabricated to match the patient’s hand for color and texture.

BODY-POWERED PROSTHESIS

Describes the control system using body movements to control a terminal device (TD). Effectively a cable attached to the prosthetic hand or hook is pulled by an exaggerated body movement to control the opening or closing of the hand or hook.

ABOVE-ELBOW, SHOULDER AND BILATERAL PROSTHESIS

Trans-humeral amputations, shoulder disarticulations and bilateral amputees are very complex cases that require treatment from a team of experienced professionals. This team involves the surgeon, nursing staff, occupational therapist and prosthetist working together with the patient to develop an effective rehabilitation program. Designing an effective prosthetic solution has to take into consideration the level of amputation, patient’s vocational needs, hobbies and home situation to design a custom solution to maximize their independence and function.

PROSTHETIC ARMS

Describes using an externally powered prosthetic arm and can be controlled by the patient in several ways.

PROSTHETIC LINERS

Some designs of prosthetic arms use locking liners to suspend the prosthesis. This replaces the need to use a harness to suspend the limb in some cases.

SOCKET TYPES

SELF-SUSPENDING AND SUCTION SOCKET SOLUTIONS
Skin-fit suction sockets are commonly used in conjunction with myoelectric prostheses. This allows the electrodes to have direct contact with the patient’s skin. These may be used with and without a valve.

POI’S APPROACH

WHAT IS YOUR APPROACH TO WORK?
Our approach to patient care is one of collaboration and application. We work with the patient and the doctor to ensure the desired outcome is clearly defined. We will select prosthetic components (ankles or knees) that ensure alignment with the positive outcome the team has defined. The mission is patient comfort. The only way to achieve the mission is to provide custom prosthetic solutions for the individual patient versus a one size fits all approach. Our focus is on YOU!

 

WHY CHOOSE POI?
We are a family business with family values. Shareholders and corporate directives don’t dictate our approach to patient care, allowing us to put our patients first. Our mission isn’t to get as many patients through the door as possible but to serve our patients at the very highest level. Our size allows us to be nimble and flexible in serving our patient’s needs.

GLOSSARY OF UPPER EXTREMITY TERMS

Myoelectric: A myoelectric-controlled prosthesis is an externally powered artificial limb that you control with the electrical signals generated naturally by your own muscles. These components can be a hand, wrist or elbow. Some examples would be the Bebionic hand, Michelangelo prosthetic hand, system electric Greifer, Axon hook, and Dynamicarm elbow.

Hybrid: This is a combination of body-powered and myoelectric designs.

Body-Powered: This is where certain exaggerated body movements pull tension on a cable and this then opens or closes a prosthetic hand or terminal device such as a split hook.

Passive arm prosthesis: This is a design of a prosthetic arm that does not have active movements. It is a lightweight solution that can be used as a post/counter support to facilitate activities. It also has the advantage of being more cosmetic than some other designs.

Body harness: This is a system of straps that help suspend the prosthesis and can be used with a body-powered device as an anchor point for an activation strap.

Prosthetic Gloves: Color-matched glove that gives the prosthesis a more natural appearance and protects the inner components from damage.

Silicone prosthesis: These are custom, high-definition, silicone prosthetic restorations that have been designed to match the patient’s natural hand shape, texture and color to appear as lifelike as possible. They can include details such as finger creases, freckles, hair and even acrylic nails that can be painted. These range from partial finger restorations and partial hands, to full hands and arms.

Passive functional devices: These devices can be attached to the wrist of the prosthesis to help with specific activities. Devices can include tools for work, self-care, and hobbies. Common examples are cutlery, driving adaptors, fishing rod holders to devices to help play basketball.

Naked prosthetics: Custom prosthetic devices designed specifically for finger amputations. These prosthetic fingers are very functional and use the movements of other finger and hand joints to power and control the fingers.

 

 

 

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